ASU's Got Talent: Visual Arts

ASU's Got Talent: Visual Arts

ASU's Got Talent: Visual Arts

ASU’s Got Talent: Visual Arts celebrates Sun Devil student artists working in paint, sculpture, pen and ink, graphic design, architecture, jewelry, quilting and more. Each artist was allowed to submit one piece for consideration and all submitted works are featured below in the ASU’s Got Talent Digital Gallery and were voted on for the title of Outstanding Student Artwork at ASU. The top-scoring four pieces received cash prizes with the winner taking home $1,000.

And the winners are...

Estevan Curiel

Estaban Curiel

Herberger Institute of Art and Design

Esteban Curiel is a native of Phoenix, AZ with a background in urban graffiti. Graffiti transitioned his styles into murals, and the more those walls extended, the more his creativity did. Attending art school at Phoenix College and Arizona State University, he introduced his murals and graffiti concepts to canvas, ceramics and digital culture. He is engraved with the struggle and resilient labor of the city, but those endeavors enable durability of sustaining a city in a desert.

Artist Statement

Looking at my new work, I reference traditional 16th century Renaissance master paintings. The only difference is that I’m painting them in a contemporary time with a stylistic fashion. When choosing the right image, I scroll through my art history books in search of an image to paint. Usually, I am searching for an intriguing, yet challenging work of art.

The allusion is the most important portion since it leads to the recreation of the master’s work. What comes from it is the final product with the expression that takes their momentum combining them to fuel my drive in order to recreate or to innovate a master painting into my own; it is sort of a mimicking approach to creation.

Applying my graffiti street style of the signature, what we call “tag,” around the background imitating a vandalized wall, brings a rooted substance from the hip-hop culture. Mixing European and Mesoamerican imagery together creates a modern mashup of two cultures into one body of work. Dialoging each piece in their own context, but keeping my choice in color scheme.

 

Khoa Ho

Khoa Ho

School of Life Sciences, Neuroscience and Biomedical Sciences

Khoa Ho is the proud descendant of a Dragon and a Fairy from the Far East. Living the dream since 1993.

Artist Statement

I took this picture on my very first trip to La-La Land. Since it was a lovely Monday morning and my friends refused to wake up early, I picked up my camera and headed outside for a few hours, documenting life as I usually did.

As I walked around Koreatown, getting lost on purpose, I ran into this lady. She appeared to be in a rush, too busy pondering something that she totally paid no attention to me and my little camera pointing towards her just a few feet away. And when she got into my picture, somehow, she brought in something mesmerizing with her, something like a piece of her life.

Until this day, I still cannot tell what exactly that "something" is; however, every time I take a look at this picture, I can clearly feel its presence. That "something" hooks my interest in a strange way that it evokes my curiosity about that lady of the West and the story of her life. I wish I'd stopped her and started a conversation, and I bet that would have been a fun experience. But at least she has gifted me something precious - a fragment of her life.

 

Kimberly Lyle

Kimberly Lyle

Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, MFA in Intermedia

Kimberly Lyle is an interdisciplinary artist, utilizing sound, video, installation and interactive electronic media. Her current research explores issues related to systems of language, translation, culture and learning. She is currently an MFA student in intermedia at Arizona State University and holds a BA in both psychology and fine art from Stetson University. She has attended residencies at the Vermont Studio Center, Mildred's Lane, Arquetopia Foundation and Elsewhere Museum.

Artist Statement

In this interactive sound sculpture, a soft and intimate part of the body, the tongue, is cast out of bronze. Viewers are invited to touch the tongues. The ability of the body to hold a slight charge triggers the sound of a vowel in English or Spanish to be spoken. Vowel sounds are the first our mouths learn as we come into a language. As several are touched in a row, they begin to take on qualities of musical notes.

 

Mahdi Ilami

Mahdi Ilami

Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, Mechanical Engineering

Mahdi Ilami is a Ph.D. student of mechanical engineering at Arizona State University. He got his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mechanical engineering in Iran. He also received his certificate in drawing at Art School of Tehran University. Alongside his continual achievements in education and engineering, he continues to pursue and excel in art. His first engagement in the world of art was with color pencils as a child; over the course of several years he explored many different materials until he found his interest in drawing with graphite, which evolved into dual passions in drawing with charcoal and oil painting on canvas.

Artist Statement

In my opinion, different perspectives, reflections and distortions create interesting images of our surroundings. Even the simplest of everyday routines become interesting when rendered through a different viewpoint. You might see your reflection distorted on an object like a spoon and ignore it, but as an artist I try to bring that astonishing reflection back into my audiences’ attention, so they will look for it in their life.

In the “Metal Ball Reflection” work, I try to show that a common body pose can become a new and interesting image if we allow our eyes to look through a metal ball with its relative magnification, curves and distortion reflections.