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Peer-to-Peer Impact

Peer-to-Peer Impact

High School Program

Students promoting social and emotional well-being

Peer-to-Peer Impact is a multi-level training and mentorship program that prepares students to be effective helpers and leaders in their school to help create and strengthen mental health prevention programs in high school.

Program components

Training to create a safe and caring school community
Collaboratively creating a roadmap for impact
Continued engagement and sustainability through ASU student mentorship

Benefits to youth engaging in peer-to-peer well-being efforts:

Builds and enhances social leadership skills
Strengthens resiliency and coping with stress
Improves academic performance and reduces drop out rates
Increases help-seeking behavior, reduces symptoms and prevents suicide

Current youth data

National Alliance on Mental Illness Data

Source: National Alliance on Mental Illness. (2020, December). Mental health by the numbers.
50%
of all lifetime mental illness begins by age 14, and 75% by age 24.
2nd
Suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death among people aged 10-34.
70.4%
of youth in the juvenile justice system have a diagnosed mental illness.
1 in 6
U.S. youth aged 16-17 experience a mental health disorder each year.
2x
High school students with significant symptoms of depression are twice as likely to drop out compared to their peers.

The 2020 Arizona Youth Survey revealed key reasons for using substances:

Source: Arizona Criminal Justice Commission. (2020). Arizona youth survey state report.
To have fun
When feeling sad or down
To feel good
To deal with stress from family, peers, school

The fall 2020 Active Minds survey identified ways that COVID-19 has impacted students’ mental Health

Source: Active Minds. (2020, September). Student mental health survey.
1 in 4
students surveyed said that their depression significantly increased.
80%
of high school students reported experiencing stress or anxiety.
24%
reported feeling disconnected from friends or loved ones.
67%
of students reported an increase in supporting others with their mental well-being.