Program Descriptions, Learning Objectives and Presenter Biographies

2019 Arizona Psychology Training Conference

Helping Squared: The exponential benefit of contributing back to the profession

Attendees will also receive certificates for up to 5.5 hours of Continuing Education Credit for attendance.  CE credit is offered through Arizona State University Counseling Services, which maintains record of attendance, as well as program and credentialing information of speakers.  Programs are designed to meet continuing education requirements as indicated in Arizona Board of Psychologist Examiner Rules, though the Board ultimately determines acceptableness of all continuing education credits. "

Keynote Address

Title:  How to Stay Interested in Your Own Career

Presenter:  Greg Shrader, Ph.D.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

  1. Identify trends in psychological practice.
  2. Explore ways of sustaining and enlivening interest in their careers.

Program Description:

What motivates people to become psychologists initially?  What changes in their motivation when faced with the realities and demands of clinical practice and life?  How is it possible to maintain and sustain interest over the span of a career, especially when faced with adverse circumstances?  Dr. Shrader will share what has inspired him in the journey forward when life and career can be challenging, overwhelming, and depleting, and hopefully provide a little extra inspiration for the audience as well.

Presenter Biography:

Dr. Greg Shrader is a psychologist who is right back where he started from, working for ASU Counseling Services.  He is a graduate of the California School of Professional Psychology in Los Angeles, completed his doctoral internship at the University of Arizona’s Counseling and Testing Services, did a postdoctoral fellowship at Biodyne of Arizona, and worked at ASU’s Counseling and Consultation for many years before becoming a Professor of Clinical Psychology at the Arizona School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University.  Dr. Shrader was a long-time regional trainer for the American Psychological Association’s HIV Office for Psychology Education (HOPE,) provided sexual health education with the Southwest Center for HIV/AIDS for many years, and is a member of APA’s Division 44 (The Society for the Study of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity) Training and Education Committee.  He also maintains a small private practice in Tempe, AZ. 

Break-Out Session 1-A

Title:  Self-Compassion: Do You Have It?  

Presenter:  William Marsh, Psy.D.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

  1. Participants will be able to identify signs of burnout and compassion fatigue in themselves, co-workers, and trainees.
  2. Participants will become familiar with the six components of self-compassion and self-criticism.
  3. Participants will be able to implement experiential exercises to foster a self-compassionate attitude in themselves and in trainees.

Program Description:

Burnout and compassion fatigue are states of mind in which professionals—particularly those in helping professions—experience emotional fatigue, detachment, and low sense of accomplishment in their work. It can limit and inhibit one’s passion for helping others. When professionals experience high levels of burnout, they may feel disconnected from that passion which inspired them to pursue work as a therapist, doctor, social worker, or other helping professional in the first place. In order to allow that passion to be fostered or re-captured, trainers and professionals must be aware of the effects of burnout and compassion fatigue.

To stave off the effects of burnout, individuals in helping professions can practice fostering attitudes of self-compassion, a known antidote to feelings of burnout (Barnard & Curry, 2012; Barnett & Flores, 2016). Self-compassion, operationalized by Kristin Neff (2003), is an attitude in which an individual extends kindness towards oneself, recognizes failure as part of the human condition, and takes a balanced perspective in painful situations. This is in contrast to self-criticism, where individuals are harsh and judgmental toward themselves, feel alone in the shortcomings, and become stuck on their failures.

The proposed program will introduce the symptoms of burnout and how they may manifest in helping professionals’ lives. The program will also introduce the concept of self-compassion and its benefits, including its association with reduced burnout symptoms. The program will introduce resources for measuring self-compassion. Participants will have the opportunity to experience different activities, including mindfulness meditations, aimed at increasing self-compassion and reducing self-criticism. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss how these exercises can be used in their own self-care, as well as in training and leadership settings. Topics of supervision will be introduced, including how supervisors can model and encourage self-compassionate attitudes in their trainees and identify unhealthy levels of self-criticism.

Presenter Biography:

Dr. William Marsh is a licensed clinical psychologist and Program Director of the Erickson Clinic, an integrated healthcare outpatient clinic for Southwest Behavioral and Health Services. Dr. Marsh first earned his master’s degree in clinical psychology at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania and completed an internship at Warren State Hospital providing individual and group psychotherapy to patients with serious mental illness in addition to administering psychological assessment batteries. He then earned a doctorate degree in clinical psychology at the Arizona School of Professional Psychology. Dr. Marsh fulfilled an APA accredited doctoral residency at Southwest Behavioral and Health Services at an outpatient health center providing individual, couple/family, and group psychotherapy to clients ranging from children to geriatrics. There he learned the value of providing client directed, outcome informed therapy which facilitated meaningful change within the client. He subsequently completed a 2,000 hour post-doctoral fellowship developing a school-based clinical program for a self-contained special education school for children with emotional and behavioral disabilities. He has significant experience supervising and training doctoral students in clinical psychology programs in providing individual and group psychotherapy, conducting functional behavioral assessments and creating individualized intervention plans, consulting with general and special education teachers, as well as conducting psychological assessments. Clinical training and experience has involved individual, couple/family, and group psychotherapy with particular focus on play therapy and attachment work that integrated strengths-based and trauma-informed approaches. He is well-versed in person-centered, psychodynamic, experiential, family-systems and cognitive behavioral theories and interventions. Additional clinical training and experience in conducting social security and veteran disability evaluations has honed his diagnostic and conceptualizing skills. He has also had considerable clinical experience working with substance use, suicide, grief/loss, medical conditions (including TBI’s), ADHD and behavioral disorders. Dr. Marsh values strong clinical training and has a passion for fostering positive interpersonal dynamics that assist others, whether they are peers, students, or clients, to identify, support, and reach their goals and dreams.

Break-Out Session 1-B

Title:  Productive Conflict: A Clinical and Ethical Framework for Managing Conflict

Presenter:  Michael J. Redivo, Ph.D.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training:

  1. Participants will identify how conflict is a catalyst for meaningful learning and growth.
  2. Participants will learn aspects related to the biology of learning and apply this to their productive use of conflict.
  3. Participants will learn the 3 E’s of productive conflict and the value it offers as a framework for using to engage conflict productively.

Program Description:

Have you ever been overwhelmed by conflict with a client, colleague, supervisor, and / or supervisee?  Perhaps, the conflict not only presented a challenging clinical situation, but also involved an ethical issue(s).  If you have, join the rest of us!  After all, conflict is part of our day to day work.  It often moves us out of our comfort zone.  Whether it be interpersonal or intrapersonal, conflict can often bring us and those we work with to a place of meaningful growth. 

This workshop will present a user-friendly framework for managing conflict in a productive and empowering manner.  This framework can be used in various contexts, including supervision, ethical decision-making, and clinical intervention.   Consistent with best practices and to avoid death by PowerPoint, varied teaching and learning methods will be used.  Small group discussion, videos, role plays, and didactic information will be provided to help you learn more about this unique model.  The overall goal of the workshop is for you to not only have a framework, but also real-world practical strategies to use the next day in your practice.

Presenter Biography:

Michael Redivo has enjoyed a varied career.  He has practiced in community mental health, public and private schools, and private practice.  He specializes in working with children, adolescents and families.  Michael has taught at the graduate level, and he has served as a director of clinical training.  Recently, he has authored a parenting book and he enjoys serving as a board member on two boards:  Family Promise and the Arizona Psychology Training Consortium. He is married with 2 beautiful children.

Break-Out Session 1-C

Title:  Why Blacks Resist Treatment: A Historical Perspective of Assault and Trauma

Presenter:  Evelyn Burrell, Psy.D.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training:

  1. Participants will be able to identify historical and current practices that negatively impact Black people.
  2. Participants will be able to describe long-term, psychological effects of trauma and psychological assault on the Black community.
  3. Participants will be able to recognize potential barriers to treatment and gain information on how to build trust with Black clients.

Program Description:

The historical effects of racism on Blacks continue to have an extraordinary effect on the psychologist-client relationship. Research suggests that Blacks experience difficulty with trusting psychologists and may present as resistant to treatment. Historically, this lack of trust has been named “cultural paranoia.” In her presentation, Dr. Burrell will tell the story of time. She will connect significant historical assaults to ongoing disparate practices provided to Blacks. She will challenge the psychologists’ role and the generational effects of mental health within the Black community. She will provide therapeutic insights and discuss how to gain rapport and provide appropriate, helpful, treatment interventions.

Presenter Biography:    

Dr. Evelyn Burrell is a licensed clinical psychologist who earned her doctoral degree and two master’s degrees in mental health counseling and clinical psychology from the Arizona School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University. She fulfilled an APA approved doctoral residency at the Arizona State Hospital. Her clinical training was conducted in a variety of settings including correctional facilities and outpatient clinics.

Dr. Burrell has experience completing psychological and psychosexual evaluations, violence risk assessments, and therapeutic treatment for forensic populations. She specializes in working with adolescent and adult individuals with personality, mood, sexual, and paraphilic disorders.

Dr. Burrell has taught college courses at both the undergraduate and graduate level, focusing on foundational psychology, cultural diversity, diagnostics, and counseling skills. She is also the owner of Arise Consultation and Training Services, LLC, providing trainings in cultural awareness to mental health professionals, students, and educators.

In her “free time,” she enjoys traveling, playing with her twins, and spending time with her husband and friends.

Break-Out Session 2-D

Title:  The Truly Professional Presentation: Becoming Memorable Using Rhetoric, Cognitive Psychology, and Technology

Presenter:  Chris McBride, Psy.D.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

  1. Practice using Blooms Taxonomy to develop dynamic learning objectives
  2. Examine how data on stress and memory can be used to help others attend to and retain new information.
  3. Compare the use of presentation tools, like PowerPoint, to identify those items that supplement understanding and avoid those that detract from the presenter and the message.
  4. Plan and evaluate activities that increase engagement with the audience.

Program Description:

Psychologists and those preparing for internship will often be in the position to design and run professional presentations for students, colleagues, and supervisors. While professionals have observed countless presentations, many can benefit from deliberate training on how to develop and implement a presentation that will hook and hold an audience. By combining the theories of classic rhetoric, neuroscience, cognition, and modern communication, attendees will be able to compose a lesson plan and deliver a presentation that can benefit their community, business, school and professional portfolio.

Presenter Biography:

Dr. Chris McBride is a Licensed Psychologist with a Doctorate in Clinical Psychology. Since 2015 he has been teaching full time at Grand Canyon University in their Psychology, Counseling, and Behavioral Health Science undergraduate and graduate programs. He has taught over 25 different courses. He has designed and revised over a dozen classes. He ran his own private practice seeing clients with a variety of mental health diagnoses. Dr. McBride is a member of the Arizona Psychological Association Ethics Committee serving as Chair from 2017-2019. In 2017 he was presented with the Outstanding Early Career Psychologist award from the Arizona Psychological Foundation.

Break-Out Session 2-E

Title:  Getting to Know the Arizona Board of Psychologist Examiners

Presenters:  Bob Bohanske, Ph.D.; Jeanne Galvin, J.D.; Faren Akins, Ph.D., J.D.              

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

  1. Better understand regulations relating to obtaining licensure for Psychologists in Arizona.
  2. Better understand how the BOPE regulates the practice of psychology in Arizona.
  3. What pitfalls of training and practice may lead to Board complaints and how to avoid these.

Program Description:

This interactive program is intended to acquaint Conference attendees with the Arizona Board of Psychologist Examiners including its mandates, process, rules, and statutes. Speakers and topics include the following:

Bob Bohanske, Ph.D. - Chairperson and Member of the Board - he will discuss some of the things trainees may need to know about becoming a psychologist in Arizona and important aspects of seeking licensure

Jeanne Galvin, J.D. - Board Counsel - she will explain the complaint adjudication process, possible outcomes, and various legal issues

Faren Akins, Ph.D., J.D. - Attorney for licensees - he will detail some of the common complaints that are heard by the Board, how to avoid such complaints, and what to do if you get a complaint.

Presenter Biographies:

Dr. Faren Akins is a Psychologist and Attorney licensed in Arizona and California with more than 40 years professional experience. He completed his doctorate in psychology at the University of Arizona graduating Phi Beta Kappa. He earned his law degree with Honors at Santa Clara University. He has taught at the University of Arizona, San Jose State University, and Santa Clara University. He is a published author and has received grants and fellowships. As an attorney he represents clients with licensing board complaints and provides consultation about law and ethics issues. His forensic psychology practice is devoted to work in family and juvenile law matters where he routinely provides evaluations and expert testimony.   

Dr. Bob Bohanske is the Chief of Clinical Services and Clinical Training at Southwest Behavioral & Health Services.  He received his Ph.D. in Rehabilitation Psychology from the University of Arizona and M.S. in Counseling and Rehabilitation from the University of Southern California. He completed Internships at the Center for the Study of Drug Abuse in Reseda CA, and Woodland Hills Psychiatric Medical Group, Woodland Hills CA . He completed his Residency at the Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine and Post-Doctoral Fellowship in the Institute of Behavioral Medicine both at Good Samaritan Medical Center. Dr. Bohanske has completed post-graduate studies at the UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute. He achieved Clinical Member status in the American Association of Marriage and Family Counselors in 1978. He has served as Chief Psychologist, at Meridian Point Rehabilitation Hospital, Neuropsychology Department and at Mesa Lutheran Hospitals Behavioral Health Institute. He has served on the Clinical Advisory Committee of the Maricopa County Regional Behavioral Health Authority, Professional Advisory Committee at Ottawa University and is an Assistant Adjunct Professor Clinical Psychology and Midwestern University. He consults with the Arizona Department of Health, and serves on the Arizona Board of Psychologist Examiners. Dr. Bohanske is a member of the Academy of Medical Psychology, American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and is a Diplomat and Fellow of the American Psychotherapy Association and a Distinguished Practitioner and Fellow (Psyc) of the National Academies of Practice. Dr. Bohanske is a Visiting Professor at Sias University, Xin Zheng, China. He is a registered Sub-Investigator with GlaxoSmithKline, Eli Lilly and Pfizer, Upjohn - Searle/Monsanto.

Ms.Jeanne Galvin is an Assistant Attorney General with the Arizona Attorney General’s Office. She has been with the Office for twenty-five years representing a number of State agencies including the Department/Board of Education, the Department of Health Services and numerous healthcare licensing boards. Ms. Galvin currently serves as legal counsel to the Arizona Board of Osteopathic Examiners in Medicine and Surgery, the Arizona Board of Pharmacy and the Arizona Board of Psychologist Examiners. She also serves as Rules Attorney for the Office of the Attorney General.

Break-Out Session 2-F

Title:  Recommendations for Effective Integration of Progress Monitoring into Practicum Training & Practice

Presenters:  Keiko Aoyagi, M.C., NCC, Doctoral Student, Arizona State University; Jenny Holzapfel, M.C., NCC, Predoctoral Intern, Arizona State University; James Bludworth, Ph.D., Director of Masters of Counseling Training, Director at the Counseling Training Center, Clinical Assistant Professor, Arizona State University

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

  1. Describe the rationale and findings supporting the reintegration of PM into clinical practice and graduate-level training.
  2. Identify individual and program level challenges associated with PM integration
  3. Create an action plan to address such challenges, train students in PM, and help them develop a scientist-practitioner identity.

Program Description:

Progress monitoring (PM)- systematically assessing and utilizing client feedback- is a promising tool that can significantly improve client outcomes and trainees’ professional training and supervision experience (Fitzpatrick, 2012; Ionita et al., 2016; Lambert & Hawkins, 2001). Clients who work with therapists utilizing PM are more likely to benefit from psychotherapy, and demonstrate clinically significant change within fewer sessions (Reese et al., 2009) and are less likely to drop out of therapy prematurely (Whipple et al., 2003). Not only can PM help improve client outcomes, but it can be also helpful for supervisors to provide quality supervision and help facilitate trainees’ skill development (Lambert & Hawkins, 2001). Overall, PM provides a unique experience for trainees/clinicians to receive immediate feedback from clients, which allows them to monitor client progress and the therapeutic alliance and reflect on/make appropriate changes to their current clinical approaches. Despite these potential benefits of PM, trainees, clinicians, and organizations often face challenges with integrating PM into their routine practice (e.g., Fitzpatrick, 2012; Ionita et al.,2016; Lambert & Shimokawa, 2011). Those challenges include, but not limited to: logistical concerns such as cost, time, and feasibility, fear of negative responses/evaluation from clients, peers, supervisors, and/or organizations, and performance anxiety, and insufficient knowledge about effective use of PM (Fitzpatrick, 2012; Ionita et al., 2016). However, many of the challenges, which are attributable to lack of exposure to and experience with PM, could be resolved by integration of PM into graduate training (Ionita et al., 2016). By integrating PM into training and supervision, therapists can learn to actively utilize client feedback, which is a crucial component of deliberate or science-based practice, which in turn leads to therapist expertise (Tracey, Wampold, Lichtenberg, & Goodyear, 2014). As such, the proposed workshop presentation will provide an overview of the existing literature on how to integrate PM into graduate-level training (e.g., Fitzpatrick, 2012; Ionita et al., 2016; Lambert, 2015; Lambert & Shimokawa, 2011; Tracey et al., 2014), discuss individual- and program-level challenges associated with such integration, and facilitate participants’ reflection and exploration of how they would actively integrate PM into their own practice and/or supervision of trainees.

Presenter Biographies:

Keiko Aoyagi is a third-year doctoral student in the Counseling Psychology program at Arizona State University. She is originally from Japan and holds a Master of Counseling degree from the same university. Her research interests include identity development, cultural adjustment, and psychological well-being among ethnically and racially diverse youth, particularly those in university settings. She has also developed interests in psychotherapy process-outcome research as well as training/supervision over the course of her graduate training. Clinically, she has experience working with college students as well as children and adults with cystic fibrosis. Keiko is currently at the ASU Counseling Services in Tempe for her field placement and is working on her dissertation focused on mental health among first-generation college students. 

Jenny Holzapfel is a doctoral candidate in the Counseling Psychology program at Arizona State University (ASU), and is currently completing her predoctoral internship at ASU Counseling Services. She earned a Master of Counseling from ASU and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Tusculum College. Clinically, she has worked primarily with adolescents and young adults with a university or school setting. She has also worked as a psychology consultant in a hospital where she conducted brief psychological assessments and longer evaluations for transplant readiness. She is interested in suicidal risk assessment and intervention, supervision and training practices, and interpersonal dynamics. Her dissertation combined her clinical interests to focus on supervision practices when clients presented with varying levels of suicidal risk. Jenny plans to pursue postdoctoral training after her internship year, and her future career goal is to teach and supervise training therapists.

Dr. Jamie Bludworth is a licensed psychologist, director of the Counselor Training Center and director of Masters of Counseling Training in Counseling and Counseling Psychology at Arizona State University. He teaches Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy, Masters and Doctoral Practica, and Doctoral Supervision Practicum. Dr, Bludworth has previous experience in administrative and clinical supervision as the associate director of ASU Counseling Services, where he supervised clinicians at all levels of professional development. He has worked in private practice, conducted psychological assessments for incarcerated youth, and has served as a psychological consultant for the state of Arizona. Dr. Bludworth’s primary areas of professional interest include: crisis assessment and intervention, training and supervision, and administrative and systemic practices that improve client and trainee outcomes. He is active in the American Counseling Association where he has been an invited speaker at the ACA national conference for 10 consecutive years. Dr. Bludworth received his doctorate in Counseling Psychology from Arizona State University in 2007.

Break-Out Session 3-G

Title:  Supervision About Sexuality Issues

Presenter:  Andy Hogg, Ph.D., ABPP

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training:

  1. Participants will learn to apply a sexual health model for supervising trainees who are providing psychotherapy services with gay, straight, bi, and trans clients.
  2. Participants will learn at least two sex therapy techniques to assist low sex couples.
  3. Participants will learn practical strategies for addressing sexual attraction between trainees and clients and trainees and supervisors.

Program Description:

Practicum students, interns, and residents often seek supervision concerning the sexuality issues of their clients. Common concerns are sexual desire differences in couples, infidelity, gender identity concerns, and childhood sexual trauma. More difficult challenges are sexual attraction toward clients or attraction between supervisors and supervisees. This workshop will provide sex positive guidelines for addressing sexuality concerns in psychotherapy supervision.

Presenter Biography:

Dr. Andy Hogg is in private practice in Flagstaff. Andy is an AASECT-certified sex therapist. He has taught undergraduate and graduate courses in human sexuality. He specializes in couples therapy, sex therapy, and working with first responders. He is a former president of the Arizona Psychological Association, the Arizona Psychology Training Consortium, and the Northern Arizona Psychological Society.

Break-Out Session 3-H

Title:  Developing and Managing an Ethical and Risk-Managed Private Practice

Presenter:  Afroza Ahmed, Psy.D. and Mati Aamed, M.A.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

  1. Identify fundamentals of opening a private practice.
  2. Discuss key elements of risk management to implement in clinical practice.
  3. Apply ethical reasoning, ethical standards, and laws/regulations to practice of psychology.

Program Description:

The words “private practice” conjure images of Freud’s Vienna couch or Yalom’s home office. In many important ways, private practice has evolved over history to embrace modernity and nonmaleficence. Private practice continues to attract psychologists with the prospects of independence and entrepreneurship. It is thus essential for psychologists and future practitioners to become aware of the fundamentals of developing or joining a private practice, remain informed on laws and regulations, and refresh their competencies.

Fundamentals to consider when opening a private practice will be discussed. Such considerations include advertising, proper representation of one’s competencies and services offered, consent forms, confidentiality and its limits, record keeping, and professional will, among others. Risk management in private practice will be reviewed with regard to the APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct, local and federal law, and regulations. Common ethical issues involved with private practice will be explored.

Presenter Biographies:

As a psychologist, Afroza Ahmed, PsyD., strives to understand and appreciates the human condition. Dr. Ahmed received her doctoral and master's degree in Clinical Psychology at the Arizona School of Professional Psychology (AzSPP) at Argosy University. She graduated summa cum laude with her bachelor's in psychology from Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University.

In her clinical training, Dr. Ahmed evaluated and treated individuals who struggled with trauma, anxiety, depression, emotions, relationship issues, addiction, and family challenges, among others. As part of her doctoral study, she worked at a juvenile correctional facility, the Adolescent Substance Abuse Program, and a therapeutic boarding school. Dr. Ahmed values individual differences and has personal and professional experiences with diversity, which inspired her to develop a culturally responsive program for women with collectivistic values. Dr. Ahmed completed her post-doctorate at Southwest Behavioral Health & Services, a community mental health care site, where she provided individual and couples therapy and led a trauma group, adult substance abuse group, and meditation group.

In 2016, Dr. Ahmed opened her private practice, Aama Conscious Psychological Services, PLLC, where she provides individual and couples therapy to adults. She is notably one of Arizona’s few psychologists who offers therapy in Bengali and English. Dr. Ahmed is trained in EMDR, hypnosis, DBT, and advanced mindfulness. She is a member of the Arizona Psychological Association (APA) and EMDR International Association.

Mati Aamed is a doctoral intern at Southwest Behavioral & Health Services. She received her master's in Clinical Psychology at the Arizona School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University. After Argosy’s closure in March 2019, she transferred to The Chicago School of Professional Psychology at Los Angeles where she expects to earn her doctorate in clinical psychology in 2020. She graduated with her bachelor's in psychology from Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University.

Mati provides a non-judgmental perspective both as a developing psychotherapist and in research. She has the ability to understand the rapidly developing findings in psychology. In her clinical training, Mati’s practicum experiences included community mental health agencies, a special education school, and a private practice. She has provided individual and group psychotherapy to adults and children, in addition to psychological testing, such as Arizona Department of Economic Security (DES) evaluations. Mati is trained in eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). She is a bilingual therapist who provides psychological services in English or Bengali.

In her doctoral dissertation, Mati explored psychologists’ perceptions of their competency in assessing complex trauma and their clinical experiences with treating clients with complex trauma. While at Argosy, Mati served as a teaching assistant for four years in the professional issues, ethics, conduct, and law course, in addition to psychological trauma and lifespan courses. As a library assistant in the Argosy University Library for five years, she helped streamline the services provided, especially with the care and ethical concerns of the use of the many psychological tests/protocols.

Mati previously presented her undergraduate honors thesis at the The Fourteenth Annual Stanford Undergraduate Psychology Conference at Stanford University. Her presentation at the 2019 Arizona Psychology Training Conference will be her first presentation in collaboration with her mother, Dr. Afroza Ahmed.

Break-Out Session 3-I

Title:  Developing Trainees’ Competencies on Culturally-Informed Psychological Assessment

Presenter:  Marisa Menchola, Ph.D., ABPP-CN

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

  1. Explain professional guidelines relevant to psychological assessment, with an emphasis on those addressing ethical and cultural competence issues.
  2. Describe the professional competencies related to psychological assessment.
  3. Apply findings from the literature on assessment training and supervision to their own teaching methods.

Program Description:

Psychologists serve a rapidly changing population. In order to remain relevant, our professional training must be as dynamic as the populations we serve. Training in psychological assessment must prioritize the competencies needed to provide services to individuals, families, and systems of widely diverse socioeconomic, educational, ability, generational, sexual, linguistic, ethnic/racial, and cultural characteristics. This presentation will review literature relevant to the teaching and supervision of assessment competencies, with an emphasis on preparing trainees to perform competent and ethical evaluations with diverse populations. The workshop will consist of three sections: First, we will review professional guidelines regarding assessment practices, with a focus on those addressing ethical issues specific to psychological assessment and providing assessment services to minoritized populations. Next, we will review the competencies that trainees need to develop in order to perform evidence-based, ethical, culturally-informed, and client-centered psychological evaluations with a diverse population. Finally, we will review the literature on assessment training, specifically on methods to teach, supervise, and evaluate assessment competencies, and what is known about their efficacy. We will discuss the limitations of the training literature, the implications for our training practices, and the gaps existing in the evidence base of assessment training. The overall goal of this workshop is to contribute to attendees’ development of models and methods of teaching and supervising assessment that are evidence- and competency-based, as well as client- and trainee-centered.

Presenter Biography:

Dr. Menchola obtained a Ph.D. in clinical psychology (clinical neuropsychology track) from The University of Arizona. She completed an NIA-funded post-doctoral fellowship through the Arizona Alzheimer’s Consortium. She has held positions as Assistant Clinical Professor in the College of Medicine, Director of Psychology Training in the Department of Psychiatry, and is currently Associate Clinical Professor at Banner University Medicine in the Department of Neurology. She is a practicing neuropsychologist with experience in psychological and neuropsychological assessment in outpatient, inpatient, medical, presurgical, and forensic settings, and she supervises graduate students in clinical neuropsychology. She is a native of Lima, Peru, and is particularly interested in culturally-informed (neuro)psychological evaluation practices.

Closing Panel Discussion

Being trained as a psychologist allows a student to forge links with incredible individuals that have significant knowledge and experience. What becomes clear over time is that students grow and start to connect to others, sharing the strength they gained from their predecessors. By engaging in training, psychologists become part of a chain that extends into a set past and a malleable future. Even in the face of hardship, this chain will remain unbroken. The closing of the Arizona School of Professional Psychology at Argosy University represented a significant loss for the psychology training community in Arizona. While it immediately appears that Arizona lost the collective contribution of the training faculty of Argosy, their impact still endures.  Former faculty members of Argosy University have been asked to reflect on the importance of training the next generation of psychologists, what helping those who help others means to them, and what they see as the critical issues for the psychology training community in Arizona.  This 45 minute panel discussion will include their perspectives.  

Poster Presentations

Title:  Differential Attitudes based on the Age of Pedophiles and the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse

Presenters:  Karla Caldera and Laura E. Jimenez Arista, Ph.D.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the presentation, attendees will be able to:

  1. Gain insight on public perceptions of young pedophiles.
  2. Learn about the importance of providing therapy to young pedophiles.
  3. Inform practices with relevant and updated research.

Presenter Biography:

Karla Caldera is a fourth-year undergraduate student pursuing a B.S. in Counseling and Applied Psychological Science at ASU. Her main research interest is Latinx mental health, specifically focusing on the impacts of immigration on academic and developmental growth in minors. Karla is hoping to attend graduate school to pursue a degree in counseling services upon graduating from her current program.

 

Title:  Non-Offending Stance in Pedophiles: Contributing to the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse

Presenters:  Michelle Emmanuelli and Laura E. Jimenez Arista, Ph.D.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the presentation, attendees will be able to:

  1. Know the difference between terms such as “child sex offender” vs “pedophile” and “offending” vs “non-offending” or “anti-contact” in relation to pedophiles.
  2. Get familiar with the process of non-offending commitment in some pedophiles.
  3. Articulate the difference between an anti-contact pre-commitment attitude and a commitment stance, which can help mental help providers to assist these individuals in therapy.

Presenter Biography:

Michelle Emmanuelli is an undergraduate student in the Counseling and Applied Psychology program at Arizona State University. She is currently involved as the Barrett Residential College Student Leader and the Barrett Ambassador Coordinator at ASU Polytechnic campus. Her research interest includes contributing to the prevention of child sexual abuse through understanding non-offending commitment in pedophiles.

 

Title:  Internalization and Externalization Coping Strategies in Higher Education Undocumented Students

Presenters:  Melissa Hahnke and Laura E. Jimenez Arista, Ph.D.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the presentation, attendees will be able to:

  1. Become familiar with common coping strategies used by undocumented students in times of struggle
  2. Differentiate between internal and external coping strategies in this population
  3. Learn about specific coping strategies and how those strategies have been instrumental in helping undocumented students thrive in higher education

Presenter Biography:

Melissa Hahnke is a third-year undergraduate student in the Counseling and Applied Psychological Science program at Arizona State University (ASU). Her research interests include multicultural issues in psychology and the effects of societal norms on individual wellbeing and treatment. After completing her undergraduate studies, she plans to pursue a Master of Counseling.