Program Descriptions, Learning Objectives and Presenter Biographies

2018 Arizona Psychology Training Conference

Evolution of Our Profession:  Training the Next Generation of Psychologists

Keynote Address

Title:  The Evolution of Psychological Practice: Now for Something Completely Different

Presenter:  Andy Hogg, Ph.D., ABPP

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

  1. Describe ways in which the profession of psychology is evolving.
  2. List two ways in which service delivery of psychological services is likely to change.

Program Description:

What will psychology be like twenty years from now? How will we practice psychological assessment and psychotherapy? The best prediction is that the mechanisms of change will remain the same but the methodology of service delivery will be completely different. Andy will make some educated guesses about how technology, insurance reimbursement, and diversity will affect our profession. Time keeps on slipping into the future.

Presenter Biography:

Dr. Andy Hogg is a psychologist in private practice in Flagstaff. He is a former president of the Arizona Psychology Training Consortium and the Arizona Psychological Association. Andy began the Arizona Psychology Training Conference sixteen years ago.  He was a faculty member and Director of Training at Argosy University, and he taught undergraduate and graduate courses at other Arizona universities. Andy specializes in working with couples, teens, police, and firefighters. He is an AASECT-certified sex therapist. Andy served as a sports psychologist for the Arizona Cardinals football team. He is a fan of the Monty Python comedy troupe, which tells you a lot about his warped sense of humor.

Break-Out Session A

Title: Burnout: Ethics, History and Prevention

Presenter:  Sylvia Ann Cohen, Ph.D.

Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be:

  1. Able to discuss the relationship between burnout and APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct;
  2. Familiar with the history of the burnout concept;
  3. Able to operationally define the concept of burnout;
  4. Be aware of recent research on burnout related to specific client groups;
  5. Be able to discuss several models of burnout in the literature;
  6. Be able to identify strategies to prevent and combat burnout

Program Description:

Burnout commonly affects individuals involved in the direct care of others.  It is a major problem among mental health professionals.   Burnout is associated with poor physical and mental health in professionals that engage in what has been termed “emotional labor.” Among practitioners, burnout is associated with increased error rates, poor communication, low adherence to guidelines, poor quality of care, and low client satisfaction. Studies show that approximately 20 to 60 percent of mental health professionals experience signs of burnout (American Psychological Association, 2018).

Burnout has been defined as a state of exhaustion in which one is cynical about the value of one’s occupation and doubtful of one’s capacity to perform (Maslach et al. 1997). Furthermore, it is directly related to a decreased ability to meet the mental health needs of clients. Although there is no actual consensus on a definition, experts agree that the major components are emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a sense of diminished personal accomplishment.

Burnout has been shown to emerge in parallel with the economic progress of developing countries (Schaufeli,W.B., Leiter, M.P., & Maslach, C., 2009). It has also been related to trends toward individualization and narcissism, and the fact that these constructs produce stress and frustration. The burnout process starts with the wearing out of engagement when, “energy turns into exhaustion, involvement turns into cynicism, and efficacy turns into ineffectiveness” (Maslach, C., Jackson, S.,  & Leiter, M., 1997).

Two factors contributing to the experience of work-life may help to explain burnout’s persistence as an experience, why it is so important, and why it is worthy of continued scientific inquiry in the 21st Century:

  • Persistent imbalance of demands over resources (Aiken et al., 2001; Bakker and Demerouti, 2007).
  • Workers in the twenty-first century viewing organizational missions, visions, and values with skepticism (Hemingway and Maclagan, 2004).

Although the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct do not directly address the concept of burnout, several of the general principles and specific sections are indirectly related. This presentation will discuss the concept of burnout as related to the Ethical Principles. It will explore the history of burnout and its relationship to the shift of psychology as a “calling,” to psychology as a profession. The client populations most commonly associated with burnout will be reviewed.  Several theories of burnout and related research will be explored.

The signs and symptoms of burnout will be outlined, and the scales used to identify burnout will be reviewed. Practices that can prevent and/or alleviate burnout will be discussed. These include physical and emotional self-care, social connections, and learning to prioritize work, including the incorporation of meaningful projects into the workday. Finally, the health of the institution, along with the system supports that should be developed to sustain staff members, will be outlined.

Presenter Biography:

Dr. Sylvia Cohen is currently working as a consultant in private practice. She is also on the Board of a new non-profit group, The Cohen Institute for Student Learning and Mental Health, that was recently formed to promote the growth and development of students.  She is on the AZPA Consortium Board.  For over 20 years, Dr. Cohen was the Lead Psychologist in Scottsdale Unified School District. She continues to teach at both Argosy University and NAU.

Break-Out Session B

Title: ABPP Board Certification:  What’s It All About?

Presenters:  Leonardo Caraballo, Psy.D., ABPP and Mary Lu Bushnell, Psy.D., ABPP

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

1. Explain the importance of specialty certification in psychology.

2. Describe at least 3 benefits of being board certified.

3. Explain the difference between foundational and functional competencies.

4. Discuss the sequence of board certification from application to successful completion.

Program Description

The evolution of psychology as a health service profession has increased the focus on specialization and the demonstration of clinical competence through continuous training. Board certification is one method for developing and signifying a specialized level of knowledge and skill in healthcare professions. Board certification by the American Board of Professional Psychology assures that psychologist have successfully completed the education, training, and experience required by a specialty. Specialty certification is understood to reflect an advanced level of competence that is higher than what is required by state licensure. This workshop presentation will provide attendees information regarding the board certification process and the benefits of board certification as part of the evolution of training in psychology. Furthermore, attendees will be provided a review of the foundational and functional competencies that are expected from a specialist and the sequence of the board certification process.

Presenter Biographies:

Dr. Leonardo J. Caraballo is a psychologist with the Phoenix VA Health Care System and works as part of an interprofessional team to serve Veterans with serious mental illness (SMI). He received his doctoral degree in Clinical Psychology from La Salle University (Philadelphia, PA) in 2013. Dr. Caraballo completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System with a focus in Psychosocial Rehabilitation and Recovery (PSR&R) and SMI. He is board certified in Clinical Psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology. He serves as an At-Large Director and board examiner for the American Board of Clinical Psychology. He also serves as the President-Elect of the Arizona Psychological Association and as the Chair of the LGBTQ Committee.

Dr. Mary Lu Bushnell is a neuropsychologist and the Director of Training for the Neuropsychology Fellowship Program at the Phoenix VA Medical Center. She is board certified in clinical neuropsychology and a practice sample reviewer for the American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology. She provides consultation to the post-deployment clinical team and TBI Clinic and conducts outpatient neuropsychological evaluations. Dr. Bushnell co-developed and leads the Brain Boosters cognitive enhancement group. She has provided education regarding traumatic brain injury to organizations such as the Phoenix and Mesa Police departments, National Guard Medical Command, court system, and vocational rehabilitation. Dr. Bushnell is an appointed member to the Arizona Governor’s Council on Spinal and Head Injuries and has served as the treasurer/secretary for APA Division 18, Psychologists in Public Service

Break-Out Session C

Title: Evolution of the EPPP – Anticipating the EPPP Part 2

Presenters:  Alison Reuter, Ph.D., ABPdN, and John Stapert, Ph.D.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

  1. Describe the EPPP Part 2 and how it was developed.
  2. Compare how knowledge and skills are assessed using the enhanced EPPP.
  3. Understand and practice at least three stress reduction exercises to utilize during EPPP preparation.

Program Description: 

As our profession evolves, so does the way in which we assess the readiness of trainees to engage in independent practice.  The Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP) has undergone ongoing development and improvements since its inception in 1965, but perhaps none as considerable as changes going into effect in January 2020.  The Enhanced EPPP will consist of two parts:  an examination of candidates’ foundational knowledge and an examination of candidates’ skills.  The current status of the development of the enhanced EPPP, including the exam blueprint, item types, the timing of the knowledge and skills portions of the EPPP, and a research project using data gathered during the beta testing of the skills portion, will be discussed.  Questions, comments, and discussion will be encouraged.  There will also be an experiential feature including relaxation exercises to help mitigate stress inherent in discussion this topic.

This workshop will be targeted toward trainees who will be taking the EPPP in the future, as well as training directors and supervisors who will be supporting future test takers.

Presenter Biographies:

Dr. Alison Reuter is an Arizona licenses psychologist, board certified in pediatric neuropsychology. She works in private practice where she conducts evaluations (both private and forensic), and also provides family and professional consultation and counseling. In addition, she works within an acute inpatient medical setting at Encompass Health Valley of the Sun Rehabilitation Hospital. Dr. Reuter works primarily with adults and geriatric patients in this setting, specializing in evaluation of and support for individuals with acquired brain injuries.  She is a member of the board of the Arizona Psychology Training Consortium, currently serving as its president.

Dr. John Stapert has maintained a private clinical practice in the Phoenix, AZ area since 1994.  He is a founding member of the board of Directors of the Arizona Psychology Training Consortium and currently serves as the Consortium’s Director of Residency Training.  Additionally, he provides behavioral medicine services at Abrazo Central Campus and Abrazo Arizona Health Hospitals.

Break-Out Session D

Title: Mentorship in a Multicultural World:  Exploring the Impact of Intersectional Identities in Creating Effective Mentoring Relationships

Presenters:  Rhonda Casillas, Ph.D. and Arti Sarma, Ph.D.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

  1. Define the meaning and purpose of mentorship within a professional context.
  2. List examples of benefits and challenges that may be encountered in the mentee-mentor relationship
  3. Discuss ways that the intersectionality of mentors’ and mentees’ identities may impact the mentorship relationship

Program Description: 

While effective mentorship can be key to the professional development and advancement of trainees and early career psychologists, it is particularly  valuable in supporting the  recruitment, training  and retention of ethnically diverse individuals that are underrepresented in the field of psychology (Roger & Molina, 2006; Maton et.al., 2011 The shortage and decrease of ethnically diverse faculty and students is an ongoing concern for many psychology graduate training programs (Brown et al., 2009; Maton et al, 2006); and as a consequence, has led to fewer active psychologist of color to serve the increasingly multiculturally and ethnically diverse U.S. population (Callahan et. al, 2018). Most critical, is the underrepresentation of Black American and Latino/a graduate students enrolled in psychology programs and  higher attrition rates among these groups (Callahan et. al, 2018). 

Psychology graduate and training programs with greater representation of ethnic diversity have often worked to create personal contact with prospective students, encouraged participation in diversity courses, and formed peer and/or faculty mentoring programs (Rogers & Molina, 2006). Furthermore, positive informal and formal mentorship experiences have been linked to more satisfaction with training programs, increased opportunities for professional development, and more commitment to the profession as a whole (Clark et al., 2000; Maton et. al., 2011; Tenenbaum et al., 2001).  Given these positive impacts, among others, this presentation aims to take a closer look at the challenges, benefits, and barriers to effective mentorship relationships from a multicultural framework and engage participants in an active discussion about ways to promote successful mentorship relationships.

Presenters will provide information regarding the definition, purpose, and utility of mentorship in a professional and training context, including ways that intersectional identities of mentors and mentees can impact this relationship. Benefits and challenges of mentorship will be discussed. In this interactive workshop, attendees will also engage with one another to discuss ways that issues of race, gender, sexual orientation, and other forms of diversity can impact the mentorship relationship, as well as ways to work through ruptures, power differentials, and multiple relationships.  

Presenter Biographies:

Dr. Rhonda Casillas is a psychologist in Primary Care - Mental Health Integration (PC-MHI) program at the Phoenix VHA.  Dr. Casillas graduated from Arizona State University with a Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology and completed a two-year fellowship in clinical health psychology at the Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Health Sciences University (GHSU). Before joining the Phoenix VHA, Dr. Casillas provided psychology and community outreach services at Arizona State University Counseling and Consultation Services and was adjunct faculty for ASU Department of Behavioral Health. Dr. Casillas has been involved in the internship and fellowship training programs at  ASU and Phoenix VHA as a supervisor, training committee member, and facilitator for the diversity seminar.  At Phoenix VHA , Dr. Casillas has focused her interest in program development of a  mentorship program for both  interns and fellows.  She has co-facilitated Intern and fellowship Mentorship program at Phoenix VHA. Her primary interests are women’s health, self-management of chronic illness, caregiver’s stress, geriatrics psychology, cross-cultural assessments and multicultural competencies.

Dr. Arti R. Sarma is a Psychologist at the Phoenix Veteran’s Affairs (VA) Hospital.  She received her doctorate in Counseling Psychology from Arizona State University in 2014 and completed her pre-doctoral internship and post-doctoral residency at ASU Counseling Services.  Over the past 10 years, Dr. Sarma has committed her research, teaching, and clinical work to helping young adults at educational facilities such as ASU and Phoenix Job Corps improve resilience and overcome barriers to academic and professional success. In her current role at the Phoenix VA, Dr. Sarma has been able to blend her passion for multicultural issues, resilience, trauma, and well-being to serve a culturally rich and diverse population. As chair of the Arizona Psychological Association’s (AzPA) Membership Committee, Dr. Sarma has been committed to increasing the accessibility, inclusivity, and applicability of AzPA’s work to mental health providers, allies, and community members. Dr. Sarma has developed and implemented initiatives focused on enhancing multicultural and advocacy competencies among trainees and early career professionals with programming such as the annual Advocacy & Psychology Workshop and panel presentations on professional issues. She has a particular interest in bolstering support for minority and international trainees through community engagement, mentorship, and collaboration.

Break-Out Session E

Title: Lessons Learned (and being learned) while enduring the Accreditation Process

Presenters:  John Barton, Ph.D., ABPP, Neil Stafford, Ph.D., and Matthew Weyer, Ph.D.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

  1. Identify 2 strategies for identifying strengths and weaknesses in their training programs
  2. Describe the basic component of a self study
  3. Describe how applying the concept of a self study may be beneficial for a program even if that program is not accredited. 

Program Description:

The process of either applying for, or re-applying for accreditation through APA is a very challenging one for Training Directors, and one that often is anticipated with apprehension if not outright dread.   Concurrently, those who work in training venues that are not accredited often think that they are glad they don't have to do it, but don't really know much about what it actually entails. Consequently, the process of accreditation often is thought and talked about mostly as defined by its onerousness, and rather than as a process that can actual be helpful for training programs. 

In this panel discussion, 3 Training Directors involved in the accreditation process either currently, or recently (or both) will discuss their experience of this process with an emphasis on what has been beneficial to their respective programs.  In doing so, it is hoped we provide an opportunity for trainers and those managing training programs, accredited or not, to consider what they are doing and how they are doing it, to support the training work they do.

Presenter Biographies:

Dr. John L. Barton is a member of the faculty and psychologist in the Psychology Department in Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, where he is the Training Director of the hospital’s APA-accredited doctoral internship.   He is also the Training Director for the Post-doctoral Residency/Fellowship in Pediatric Psychology which is a member of the Arizona Psychology Training Consortium and thereby a member of APPIC.  He specializes in the evaluation and treatment of ADHD.  He also conducts evaluations of learning disorders, and works with children and families to help in their adjustment to chronic illness (such as diabetes, epilepsy, migraine, or other medical conditions.  Dr. Barton is also the Director of the Clinical Psychology Center and Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Arizona State University, where he is currently teaching practica in psychotherapy and psychological assessment.  Dr. Barton is a diplomate of the American Board of Professional Psychology with a specialty in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology.  He has worked in an outpatient managed care setting, in private practice, and as Clinical Director of Westbridge Center for Children.  He is a member of the American Psychological Association, Society for Pediatric Psychology, Division of Clinical Child Psychology, and the Arizona Psychological Association.  He received his Doctorate from Arizona State University, where he was the Outstanding Graduate of the Graduate College.  Dr. Barton’s internship training in pediatric psychology was completed at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago.    He received his undergraduate degree, with high distinction, from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Dr. Neil Stafford is a licensed psychologist working for the Avondale Elementary School District (AESD). He is the lead psychologist supervising psychologists and counselors for the district. He has been with AESD for 13 years. Dr. Stafford is also the training director for AESD's APA accredited school psychology internship program. The program has 5 interns. Dr. Stafford was the force behind the creation of the program. He has been supervising across the training spectrum for 10 years. Dr. Stafford has served on the Arizona Psychological Association Governing Council, the Arizona Psychology Training Consortium Board of Directors, and the Maricopa County Southwest Regional Council for First Things First. Dr. Stafford is speciality board certified in School Psychology

Dr. Matthew Weyer is the Training Director of the Psychology Internship and Fellowship Programs. He has completed evidence based training in Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), Motivational Interviewing (MI) and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Therapy (EMDR). His clinical interests include intervention and treatment of medical patients. Clinical responsibilities include assessment, individual psychotherapy, and psycho-educational groups. He is one of the lead therapists in the following Health Psychology Groups: CBT-Insomnia, Progressive Management of Tinnitus, and CPAP Adherence. His theoretical orientation is eclectic with a cognitive-behavioral emphasis. He sub-specializes in clinical hypnosis and EMDR and depending on trainee interest, leads a weekly self-study group for the psychology trainees.

Break-Out Session F

Title: Preparing for Private Practice: The Graduate Course You Never Had

Presenter:  Larry F. Waldman, Ph.D., ABPP

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

  1. Define what it means to “Think like an MBA”.
  2. List characteristics of optimal business and how they relate to private practice
  3. Describe how to value your service
  4. State basic components of any successful business and how to ensure you are devoting the correct amount of time to each area.
  5. Name at least one effective new marketing strategy to attract new clients.
  6. Name at least one efficient method to become known as “The Expert”.
  7. Name at least one non-traditional concept to earn additional income.

Program Description:

Beginning a private practice is an exciting but challenging and often confusing undertaking. Psychologists are trained to provide psychotherapy but we are not trained to conduct a business of providing psychotherapy. Most small businesses fail. In this workshop some of the essential components of developing and maintaining a thriving private practice will be reviewed.  Non-traditional services will be discussed.  This program is especially appropriate for early career psychologists (ECP’s).

Presenter Biography:

Dr. Larry Waldman is a licensed clinical, school, forensic psychologist in Phoenix, Arizona.  He conducted a highly successful private practice for 40+ years.  His BS in Education/Psychology was from the University of Wisconsin; his MS in School Psychologist was from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; his PhD in Educational/School Psychology was earned at Arizona State University, and his Diplomate (ABPP) was received in 2003.  Waldman was the past president of the Maricopa Psychological Society; the Director of Psychological Services for Charter Glendale Psychiatric Hospital from 1988 to 2000; and an Official Guide on Parenting for SelfGrowth.com.  He is a Medical Consultant for the Social Security Administration; an adjunct graduate professor for Ottawa University; serves on the professional board of notMYkid, a charitable organization; and is the co-chair of the Early Career Psychologists Committee of the Arizona Psychological Association (AZPA). He is also certified by the American Council on Exercise (ACE) as a senior fitness specialist.  Waldman has written numerous articles which have been published in the local Phoenix media and in the national press, and six books—Who’s Raising Whom? Coping with Your Adolescent; How Come I love Him but Can’t Live with Him? The Graduate Course You never Had: How to Develop, Manage and Market a Flourishing Mental Health Practice – With and Without Managed Care; Too Busy Earning a Living to Make Your Fortune? Discover the Psychology of Achieving Your Life Goals; and Overcoming Your Negotiaphobia: Negotiating Through Your Life.  Waldman speaks to the public, corporations, attorneys, chiropractors, and fellow mental health professionals.  His signature presentations are: The Graduate Course You Never Had: The Business of Private Practice, Teaching Parents to Parent, Marriage University, Recognizing and Managing PTSD and Discover the Psychology of Achieving Your Life Goals.

Break-Out Session G

Title: Addressing the Needs of Transgender Trainees

Presenters: lore m. dickey, Ph.D.; Chelsey Tarazi, B.S., Laura Rodriguez, M.A., Erin S. Hanks-Moehr, M.A.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

  1. Define affirmative practice with transgender people
  2. Understand the challenges that trans trainees face
  3. Engage in advocacy on behalf of a trans trainee

Program Description:

Transgender (trans) people face myriad challenges as they come out. Regardless of the timing of coming out, completing training to become a psychologist has an additional set of stressors. In this session the presenters will explore the types of challenges faced by trans trainees and offer solutions to assist supervisors in providing affirmative supervision. The session will be grounded in the APA Guidelines for Psychological Practice with Transgender and Gender Nonconforming People. The session will begin with a brief overview of the Guidelines. After this we will explore two to four case examples (time permitting) that address different concerns. These concerns include topics such as coming out to a supervisor, coming out to a client, dual relationships in the clinical setting, and advocacy for the trainee and the supervisor

Presenter Biography:

Dr. lore m. dickey is a Counseling Psychologist and attended the University of North Dakota where he graduated in 2011. He completed his pre-doctoral internship year at Duke University. Following graduation, Dr. dickey completed a 10-month post-doctoral health policy fellowship at the Morehouse School of Medicine in the Satcher Health Leadership Institute. Currently he serves as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at NAU. His research and clinical interests focus on work with trans and gender diverse people. He has over 30 publications including an upcoming book titled A Clinician’s Guide to Gender-Affirming Care: Working with Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming Clients due out in December.

Chelsey Tarazi is a 4th year Ph.D. Student in Combined Counseling Psychology and School Psychology at Northern Arizona University. Chelsey is working on her dissertation. Her research interests include utilizing surveys and implementing interventions in order to understand culturally and linguistically diverse populations across the lifespan to support their success in academics and society. Chelsey is currently the graduate assistant for NAU Disability Resources and Practicum Student for NAU Counseling Services. Chelsey is a student member on the Commission for Disability Access and Design.

Laura Rodriguez is a fourth-year doctoral student in the Combined Counseling/School Psychology program at Northern Arizona University (NAU). She is currently a fellow in the ArizonaLend program based out of the University of Arizona and is heavily involved in the NAU Graduate Student Government.  Her research interest includes minority student success with an emphasis in addressing systemic barriers and critical social justice issues.  

Erin Hanks-Moehr, M.A., is a current doctoral student, attending the combined Counseling/School Psychology doctoral program at Northern Arizona University. She is a founder of and the current President of the College of Education Student Advocacy Organization. She has completed research and presentations in the areas of friendship, the 3-2-1 method, self-care courses impact in graduate school, narrative therapy, and is currently completing a doctoral dissertation exploring cross-cultural supervision needs and self-efficacy.

Break-Out Session H

Title: Shazam! Hitting home runs during interview season!

Presenters: Matthew Weyer, Ph.D.; Neil Stafford, Psy.D.; John Barton, Ph.D.; Lilia Miramontes, Ph.D.; and Nadine C. Cole, Ph.D.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

  1. Identify ways to maximize their chances of securing an internship
  2. Identify common mistakes intern applicants make
  3. Identify strategies to handle difficult questions

Program Description:

Interviewing for an internship position can be a stressful experience. The purpose of this program is to outline strategies for applicants to maximize their chances of securing an internship position.  Included in this discussion are common interview questions, recognizing when the interview actually starts and ends, how to present yourself throughout the interview day, and mistaken assumptions applicants sometimes make that can negatively impact them.

Presenter Biographies:

Dr. John L. Barton is a member of the faculty and psychologist in the Psychology Department in Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, where he is the Training Director of the hospital’s APA-accredited doctoral internship.   He is also the Training Director for the Post-doctoral Residency/Fellowship in Pediatric Psychology which is a member of the Arizona Psychology Training Consortium and thereby a member of APPIC.  He specializes in the evaluation and treatment of ADHD.  He also conducts evaluations of learning disorders, and works with children and families to help in their adjustment to chronic illness (such as diabetes, epilepsy, migraine, or other medical conditions.  Dr. Barton is also the Director of the Clinical Psychology Center and Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Arizona State University, where he is currently teaching practica in psychotherapy and psychological assessment.  Dr. Barton is a diplomate of the American Board of Professional Psychology with a specialty in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology.  He has worked in an outpatient managed care setting, in private practice, and as Clinical Director of Westbridge Center for Children.  He is a member of the American Psychological Association, Society for Pediatric Psychology, Division of Clinical Child Psychology, and the Arizona Psychological Association.  He received his Doctorate from Arizona State University, where he was the Outstanding Graduate of the Graduate College.  Dr. Barton’s internship training in pediatric psychology was completed at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke’s Medical Center in Chicago.    He received his undergraduate degree, with high distinction, from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Dr. Neil Stafford is a licensed psychologist working for the Avondale Elementary School District (AESD). He is the lead psychologist supervising psychologists and counselors for the district. He has been with AESD for 13 years. Dr. Stafford is also the training director for AESD's APA accredited school psychology internship program. The program has 5 interns. Dr. Stafford was the force behind the creation of the program. He has been supervising across the training spectrum for 10 years. Dr. Stafford has served on the Arizona Psychological Association Governing Council, the Arizona Psychology Training Consortium Board of Directors, and the Maricopa County Southwest Regional Council for First Things First. Dr. Stafford is speciality board certified in School Psychology

Dr. Matthew Weyer is the Training Director of the Psychology Internship and Fellowship Programs. He has completed evidence based training in Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), Motivational Interviewing (MI) and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing Therapy (EMDR). His clinical interests include intervention and treatment of medical patients. Clinical responsibilities include assessment, individual psychotherapy, and psycho-educational groups. He is one of the lead therapists in the following Health Psychology Groups: CBT-Insomnia, Progressive Management of Tinnitus, and CPAP Adherence. His theoretical orientation is eclectic with a cognitive-behavioral emphasis. He sub-specializes in clinical hypnosis and EMDR and depending on trainee interest, leads a weekly self-study group for the psychology trainees.

Dr. Lilia Miramontes is a Licensed Psychologist and Training Director at Arizona State University’s Counseling Services (ASU CS). She oversees the practicum and internship training programs at ASU CS. She has extensive experience working at university counseling centers. Her clinical and professional interests include: training & supervision, cognitive-behavioral therapy, motivational interviewing, mindfulness, mood disorders, multicultural competence, first generation college students, and acculturation concerns, and Latinx communities. She completed her PhD at Washington State University and internship at University of Oregon.

Dr. Nadine Cole is a licensed Psychologist and Director of Psychology Training at the Southern Arizona VA Health Care System in Tucson, AZ.  She has a Ph.D. from the Graduate School of Psychology at Fuller Theological Seminary and specializes in pyschological assessment, PTSD treatment, spirituality and coping skills and ethnic minority mental health.

Break-Out Session I

Title: Integrating Digital Technology into Psychological Practice

Presenter:  Chris M. McBride, Psy.D.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

  1. Describe a variety of web-based resources that can aid or enhance clinical practice.
  2. Evaluate the strengths and limitations of any web-based resource that is used in client care or marketing.
  3. Recognize the primary legal and ethical considerations in the use of technology in clinical practice.

Program Description:

The evolution of the profession demands that clinicians keep up with technology. Clients are becoming more web savvy and potentially web dependent daily which requires clinicians to meet their needs in a medium they are familiar with. The balance between Digital Native and Digital Immigrant populations is going to topple quickly and psychological practices ill-prepared for the transition will be left behind.

This presentation will help inform current and future practitioners on the use of digital technology in behavioral health. The session will share guidelines on appropriate use of social media to enhance a clinician’s online presence and warning of the various ethical pitfalls that are not adequately prepared. The presentation will also introduce assets and liabilities of online scheduling, documentation, and billing systems. Basic information on steps to build a professional web site will also be provided.

Presenter Biography: 

Dr. Chris McBride is a Licensed Psychologist with a Doctorate in Clinical Psychology (Psy.D.). He is a full time faculty member at Grand Canyon University teaching Psychology, Counseling, and Behavioral Health Science. He runs his own private practice seeing clients with a variety of mental health diagnoses. Dr. McBride is the Chair of the Arizona Psychological Association Ethics Committee and in 2017 he was presented with the Outstanding Early Career Psychologist award from the Arizona Psychological Foundation.

Closing Panel Discussion

Title: When the Helper Needs Help

Presenters: lore m. dickey, Ph.D.; Chelsey Tarazi, B.S., Laura Rodriguez, M.A., Erin S. Hanks-Moehr, M.A.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the training, attendees will be able to:

  1. Understand how to advocate for privacy in the clinical setting
  2. Develop an awareness for the ways that being a mental health provider can get in the way of one’s care
  3. Discuss some of the challenges that arise during re-entry to one’s life.

Program Description:

Just like our clients, there are times when we need help with a difficult situation we are facing. This might include relationship issues, workplace concerns, mental health issues including substance abuse, or mood disorders to name a few. There is a great deal of stigma around mental health concerns. This stigma is just as present in the profession as it is in the community. This session will explore some of the challenges that a mental health provider might face when seeking care. Topics to be addressed include 1) privacy, 2) finding care in a small community, 3) being a client and not a provider, and 4) re-entry after care.

Presenter Biography:

Dr. lore m. dickey is a Counseling Psychologist and attended the University of North Dakota where he graduated in 2011. He completed his pre-doctoral internship year at Duke University. Following graduation, Dr. dickey completed a 10-month post-doctoral health policy fellowship at the Morehouse School of Medicine in the Satcher Health Leadership Institute. Currently he serves as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology at NAU. His research and clinical interests focus on work with trans and gender diverse people. He has over 30 publications including an upcoming book titled A Clinician’s Guide to Gender-Affirming Care: Working with Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming Clients due out in December.

Chelsey Tarazi is a 4th year Ph.D. Student in Combined Counseling Psychology and School Psychology at Northern Arizona University. Chelsey is working on her dissertation. Her research interests include utilizing surveys and implementing interventions in order to understand culturally and linguistically diverse populations across the lifespan to support their success in academics and society. Chelsey is currently the graduate assistant for NAU Disability Resources and Practicum Student for NAU Counseling Services. Chelsey is a student member on the Commission for Disability Access and Design.

Laura Rodriguez is a fourth-year doctoral student in the Combined Counseling/School Psychology program at Northern Arizona University (NAU). She is currently a fellow in the ArizonaLend program based out of the University of Arizona and is heavily involved in the NAU Graduate Student Government.  Her research interest includes minority student success with an emphasis in addressing systemic barriers and critical social justice issues.  

Erin Hanks-Moehr, M.A., is a current doctoral student, attending the combined Counseling/School Psychology doctoral program at Northern Arizona University. She is a founder of and the current President of the College of Education Student Advocacy Organization. She has completed research and presentations in the areas of friendship, the 3-2-1 method, self-care courses impact in graduate school, narrative therapy, and is currently completing a doctoral dissertation exploring cross-cultural supervision needs and self-efficacy.

Poster Presentations

Title: Training with Heart Matters: An Interprofessional Education Activity Between Clinical Psychology and Pharmacy

Presenters: Beth Richter, M.A., Jasmine Pollom, M.A., Angela Breitmeyer, Psy.D., Mary Gurney, Ph.D.

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of the presentation, attendees will be able to:

Identify at least three general benefits of IPE.

1. Identify at least three specific benefits of interprofessional collaboration between pharmacy and clinical psychology.
2. Explain the importance of relational and humanistic competencies in both disciplines.
3. Discuss how the patient standard-of-care is enhanced by interprofessional collaboration.

Presenter Biography:

Beth Richter, M.A., is a fourth-year student on the Neuropsychology Track in the Doctorate of Clinical Psychology program at Midwestern University in Glendale, Arizona. Beth has been active in promoting the evolution of psychology through her various teaching roles. Beth presented to over 400 high school students regarding pursing a career in the field of psychology. Additionally, she provided support for psychology students by volunteering to tutor students for a psychology writing lab and working as a teacher’s assistant for 7 different classes. Beth facilitated a workshop that informed and explored issues about gender and sexual, LGBTQIA identities. She has also facilitated an interdisciplinary workshop with pharmacy students to promote interdisciplinary collaboration, as well as assist pharmacy students enhance relational and humanistic competencies. Beth’s clinical training in clinical psychology, health psychology, and neuropsychology has included work in a private practice, family medicine clinic, rehabilitation hospital, neurology clinic, and a school for children with learning and developmental disabilities. She has a passion for assisting in the assessment process and providing therapy to children with various academic, intellectual, social, and emotional needs. Her areas of interest include working with various childhood issues including but not limited to developmental asynchrony, chronic illness, and executive function disorders.

 

Title: The Only Constant is Country: A Military Cultural Competency Course for Civilian Psychologists

Presenter: Jourdin Watkins Navarro, M.A., CCTP

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

  1. Describe, define, and identify the components of “Warrior Ethos”
  2. Identify the basic organizational structure of the military as well as customs and components that separate military culture from mainstream American culture
  3. Self-reflect on personal beliefs and biases related to mental health in the military, military lifestyle, and military service members and veterans as clients.

Presenter Biography:

ENS Jourdin Watkins Navarro is a fourth-year doctoral candidate in the Doctor of Psychology program at Midwestern University in Glendale, AZ. She received her B.A. in Psychology from Kansas Wesleyan University in 2014 and her M.A. in Clinical Psychology from Midwestern University in 2017. ENS Navarro was accepted into the U.S. Navy Health Professions Scholarship Program in 2016 and plans to pursue a career in active duty psychology, with clinical interests in neuropsychology, operational psychology, and program development. She graduated from Officer Development School in September 2017 and will begin her pre-doctoral internship at Naval Medical Hospital Portsmouth in Portsmouth, VA in August 2019.

 

Title:  Considerations in Implementing Data Collection Procedures for Counseling Training Facilities

Presenter: Jenny Holzapfel, M.C., NCC

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

1. understand trainee' perspectives on use of a client feedback system
2. identify areas of consideration for implementing a client feedback system
3. describe benefits and drawbacks of a client feedback system

Presenter Biography:

Jenny Holzapfel is a doctoral candidate in the Counseling Psychology program at Arizona State University (ASU). She earned a Master of Counseling from ASU and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Tusculum College. Clinically, she has worked primarily with adolescents and young adults from a person-centered, culturally responsive framework. She is interested in suicidal risk assessment and intervention, supervision practices, and interpersonal dynamics. Her dissertation combines her clinical interests to focus on supervision practices when clients present with varying levels of suicidal risk. Other research interests include experiences of and attitudes toward student-athletes and intercultural couples. Jenny’s future career goal is to teach and supervise training therapists. In all the spare time graduate school allows her, Jenny enjoys running and competing in triathlons with her husband.

 

Title:  Integrating Autism in College

Presenter: Reilly Rowland

Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this presentation, attendees will be able to:

1. Review current graduation rates for those diagnosed as compared to a normal sample.
2: Understand personal and environmental barriers that restrict college success for autistic individuals.
3:  Explore the skills and resources that benefit autistic individuals and are most likely to lead to educational success.

Presenter Biography: Reilly Rowland is an undergraduate student that is about to graduate from Grand Canyon University and been accepted into a graduate program at Argosy University Phoenix.